A Teaspoon of Vinegar

Hello to those whom have been following this site, first of all my sincere apologies for the long delay in adding posts, but one has to make a living and this year the work load has been hectic to say the least with another 4 months left before the much needed break is taken. Nonetheless, I am taking time out to write this new article as it may be of use to those having water problems.

As we are aware the majority of fauna that exist in the wild receive their moisture via rain fall, which is acidic and thus they are able to thrive quite well and bonsai are no exception. Those that reside in houses with gardens rain fall can be collected, but for some whom live in apartments this is not an option and the only water availlable is from the kitchen tap. This water although safe for humans to consume is full of disinfectants and various chemicals that leave a hard whitish residue on appliances it come into contact with – including ceramic bonsai pots. The extent or amount of chemicals and disinfectants in domestic water will vary depending on where in the world one resides.

The problem with using water from a domestic supply is that it has a detrimental effect on a bonsai tree’s ability to grow and maintain good health and if one has looked at the article on ‘pH soil requirement’ previously posted one can see the various acidic or alkaline requirements for various species. But having the correct soil medium for a plant is but one important factor the other is the water quality, giving a tree water containing disinfectants/chemicals is a sure way of giving it a slow death.

To eliviate this problem tap water can be used providing it has been treated with vinegar (The type is irrelevant) one level teaspoon of vinegar (1 mltr) to 7 litres of water and left to stand for 2 days.

This tap water problem was explained in detail to students who attend the beginners bonsai workshop prior to an up comming visit to a nursery to hunt for potential bargains for example, this Abies procera glauca prostrata known as the Noble Fir.

 

Noble fir

 

2 Noble firs were purchase as they showed signs of potential and were good candidates for design, the tree depicted above was given a basic design and one can see the new shoots developing after a short space of time. The student who purchased the other specimen brought it to the worshop but sadly much of the apex had turned brown, this was due to giving the tree water from the kitchen tap; Whereas the tree depicted above was/is only given water with the vinegar solution.

At this juncture I am conducting further experiments on my trees with regard to the ratio of vinegar and water to determine what solution is best for a particular species. Hence another post on this topic will be forthcomming. Untill next time, BW, N.

 

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